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in paris. one day i said to him, "can you tell me something about color?" he says, "there's one thing i can tell you -- nobody understands color." i said, "fine, that's just the way it is with me." and that was the end of that problem. around 1958, '59, somewhere around there, i started a painting. it was 18 feet by about 9 or 10 feet, and i'd never done a painting that big. and then i realized i didn't have the space to come back to see my painting. it was too close, and i couldn't seem to get far enough away to see what i'm doing. then my feeling about how i see a painting changed. i realized every time i do something, if i have to run back to take a look at it, it's impossible. i can't paint that way. ah! ah! instead of looking, i had to feel it. ah! in order to feel it, to work with it, i had to carry that feeling. well, a little more, little more, little more. it really made the biggest difference in my life as far as painting goes. pat responds to something much more beautiful, much more rhythmic. i'm really not rhythmical or beautiful. i'm just like a different something. i fall. i-i
close to the land and its people. but as a young man in paris, he joined th friends like max ernst and jean arp in the emerging surrealist movement of the 1920s. in his painting "the farm," miro's characteristic symbols and themes began to appear: serpentine shapes, checkerboard patterns, infinite space represented by the moon or a star. in 1922, he painted "the farmer's wife," the ancestress of countless female symbols that also became a continuing motif in miro's art. in 1924, his art broke free of gravitational constraints in the surrealistic world of "harlequin's carnival." over the years, he developed his own personal symbolism, and in the 1950s, the scale of his art grew with such works as a mural at harrd university and "the wall ofhe sun" for unesco in pas. as his work grew in size, miro continued what he termed "a process of simplification." he stated, "little by little, i have managed to reach a point at which i use no more than a small number of forms and colors." this process found a culminating expression in his eightoot-high painting "femme," miro entered the project
close to the land and its people. but as a young man in paris, he joined with friends like max ernst and jean arp in the emeing surrealist movement of the 1920s. in his painting "the farm," miro's characteristic symbols and themes began to appear: serpenne shapes, checkeoard patterns, finite space represented by the moon or a star. in 1922, he painted "the farmer's wife," the ancestress of countless female symbols that also became a continuing motif in miro's art. in 1924, his art broke free of gravitational constraints in theurrealtic world of "harleqn's carnival." over the years, he developed his own personal symbolism, and in the 1950s, the scal his art grew with such works as a mural at harvard university and "the wall ofhe sun" for unesco in pas. as his work grew in size, miro continued what he termed "a process of simplification." he stated, "little by little, i have managed to reach a point at which i use no more than a small number of forms and colors." this process found a culminating expression the maquette for the tial gallery's tapestry. miro entered the project with much
came back to hollywood in 1962, when he and harold arlen did gay paris, which is with judy garland. she asked them to come back. and it's a cult animated cartoon now, which you can get in your video. and i remember him putting on a show at the taber auditorium. "welcome back, yip," you know? and hein '62. amy goodman: but that means that the wizard of oz made it big during the time that he was blacklisted. that wasand when you consider the social commentary that it was making, that's pretty profound. ernie harburg: yeah, but i don't think hardly anyone knows the political symbolism underneath the wizard of oz, because, again, it's a thing that happens in finian's rainbow, even though as peter stone, a noted playwright on broadway, said, "it's the only socialist tract ever on broadway." alright? people don't hear the political message in it, ok? they are vastly entertained. the same thing happens with the wizard. you know, nobody would even think of such a thing. yip harburg: my songs, like "when the idle poor become the idle rich" and "brother, can you spare a dime?" caused a great deal
was sent out from paris and did a lot of mapping of the terrain and was part of the discovery of peking man, in fact. so, here is a christian deeply committed in his own paradigm but spent all that time in china and asia absorbing in a sense that the imperative of finding oneness and he found it in a powerful way. >> and so true that you get that feeling of oneness instinctively from being in that world view. yes janet, then we go to the roll in here. >> i wanted to go back to the relationship idea for just a moment - maybe the reason that doctrines define the male relationships is that the relationship of the female with offspring when everybody has got a mother is just a biologically programmed thing. those two beings share body cells together and it seems that this doesn't even need words to describe that definition of that relationship with ones mother. and so it maybe the male relationships need more definition because they don't start out with that level of oneness. >> well, that's exactly the somewhat apologetic explanation i came across. that it's so biologically with a mother that'
. >> the natural beef at the lucky dog ranch fits in perfectly at their restaurant, where their theme is paris meets the west. part fancy, part farmy, this unique food fusion is catching on here. they celebrate the american west with a brand of cooking that reinterprets the familiar staples of the prairie. chili, burgers, and tri-tip are the norm at roxy, but they all have the couple's own spin on it, much of which they get from working out on the prairie, so to speak, and by highlighting the efforts of many of their friends and fellow farmers and ranchers in the area. >> well, it's always--always nice to know where your food is born, raised, grown. we were both born and raised on farms, per se, uh, and when you grow up on a farm, you taste the eggs that are laid that same day. >> and while they may just think of themselves as 2 little farm kids, this couple has a culinary talent that is exceeding even their own expectations. roxy is actually their second restaurant in sacramento, and it's based on their fundamental beliefs that if you start with good, quality products, you don't need to fuss
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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